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The first Bostock arrived in Ceylon in 1884- John Henry Bostock. He arrived to take up the post of a resident engineer at the Colombo Harbour. Norman Bostock, J.H. Bostock’s son was born in England and on leavning Marlborough College in 1910, he travelled to Sri Lanka. At around the same time, Elizabeth Pyman and her sister Ruth, the two attractive daughters’ of a wealthy ship owner, embarked upon their cruise around the worldThe first Bostock arrived in Ceylon in 1884- John Henry Bostock. He arrived to take up the post of a resident engineer at the Colombo Harbour. Norman Bostock, J.H. Bostock’s son was born in England and on leaving Marlborough College in 1910, he travelled to Sri Lanka. At around the same time, Elizabeth Pyman and her sister Ruth, the two attractive daughters’ of a wealthy ship owner, embarked upon their cruise around the world [Read more]
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The first Bostock arrived in Ceylon in 1884- John Henry Bostock. He arrived to take up the post of a resident engineer at the Colombo Harbour. Norman Bostock, J.H. Bostock’s son was born in England and on leaving Marlborough College in 1910, he travelled to Sri Lanka.

At around the same time, Elizabeth Pyman and her sister Ruth, the two attractive daughters’ of a wealthy ship owner, embarked upon their cruise around the world. As organized by the girl’s grandfather, on arrival in Ceylon, they were met by A.J. and Oswin Wickwar. They escorted the girls on many expeditions and adventures while they holidayed in Ceylon. It so happened that Norman Bostock happened to join them on some of these outings.

In a very short time Norman had decided that Elizabeth was the girl for him. Norman proposed to her in the Churchyard of a little village called Aislaby in Yorkshire. They were later married in Colombo in 1923.

The wedding was a grand affair and included several Ceylonese friends in the guest list. During the 20’s Norman Bostock began to buy land 3 miles from Bandarawela with A.J. Wickwar. After convincing the Colombo Commercial Company, which was at the time wholly British owned, to invest the capital so that Aislaby factory could start functioning, Norman Bostock’s planting years began

Mark Bostock, Norman’s son was born in Ceylon, in September 1926 and spent most of his time here. In 1945, Mark returned to Ceylon when changing aircraft carriers as his ship, ‘The Indefatigable’ was going to Australia and he was destined for the pacific in a frightful American Liberty flat- top which he joined up in Trincomalee. During the short time he spent with his father in Colombo, they purchased Kirchhayn, another small tea estate adjoining Aislaby in Bandarawela.

When demobilized from Trincomalee in 1947, Mark headed straight to Aislaby Estate, where he began to learn the art of tea planting, and tasting. Aislaby become a leading estate in the Uva with probably the most up-to date factory in Sri Lanka.

It was a devastating blow when Aislaby was nationalized in November 1973 and all that was left was “Kirchhayn Bungalow” and the 50 Acres of land that the family were allowed to retain. Mark retired from John Keells in 1986. He sadly passed away in April 2000 and leaves behind his wife, Elizabeth and 2 daughters.

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Bostock Suite::

The master bedroom is named after the owners of Kirchhayn Bungalow. The large airy bedroom accommodates a wonderful king size four poster bed. Tall classic French windows lead out to the manicured garden just outside the room. Attached is a large dressing room. The bathroom entertains both the classic and contemporary with both a wonderful antique claw-footed bath alongside a walk in shower.


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Pyman Suite::

Fondly named after Mark Bostock’s maternal grandfather, the bedroom has two queen size beds and also a small sitting area that looks onto the front garden.


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Wickwar Suite::

This suite is named after A.J. Wickwar. He was the surveyor general and original partner of Norman Bostock who was also instrumental in the building of Aislaby Estate. This room holds some classic pieces of furniture and a time honored selection of books to tempt you.



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Lushington Suite::

The suite is named after Mr. Ronnie Lushington, the former expatriate manager of the Aislaby Estate. It has a four poster queen size bed with a separate courtyard entrance. A sitting area with rattan furniture is also a feature in this suite.



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Taylor Suite::

Also known as the Honeymoon Suite. It is names after James Taylor, who started planting tea in Ceylon in the year 1876. The room has a four poster queen size bed and is in a more secluded area of the bungalow. A sunken bath and marble bathroom complete the suite.


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